Rohr’s passion is at another level

Zach Palmer

Girls basketball coach Mike Rohr
and college basketball legend Bob
Knight have something in common.
And it’s not the number of wins.
The Hall of Fame coach and Rohr
both receive many technical fouls,
something not very common, unless
you’re talking about the two.
“I couldn’t even tell you how many
technical fouls I’ve been given in my
career. How many of those have I
earned? Probably about half of them,”
Rohr said.
Four games into the 0-4 season, and
Rohr has already received his first technical
foul. His technical foul came in a
game against Monacan, an early favorite
to win the state title and a team led
by the best junior recruit in the country,
Megan Walker.
“We were inbounding the ball on
the baseline and threw the ball out of
bounds towards our bench. Our team
was already down forty-five points in
the second quarter. The referee called it
our way, but then changed her mind after
the other coach persuaded her to call
it the other way. When I asked her over
and over again why she changed the
call, the other referee came over and hit
me with the technical,” Rohr said.
What Rohr said was the truth, but
no coach receives a technical foul for
simply asking the referee a question. It
was the commanding voice he spoke in
that forced him to receive it.
But Rohr isn’t always the bad guy; in
fact, he’s spent countless hours on the
weekends refereeing high school and
youth basketball games. In his five years
of refereeing high school ball, Rohr has
only handed out one technical foul.
“All I can remember about that
moment was thinking to myself, ‘I
would’ve probably said the same thing
if I was coaching’ and laughed it off,”
Rohr said.
Rohr’s outgoing character is what a
struggling girls basketball team needs
in term of a coach. He doesn’t have to
coach this team. If Rohr didn’t have the
passion for the sport of basketball and
girls on the team, he would’ve quit a
long time ago.
“He brings a ton of passion to the
program and a vast amount of basketball
knowledge. You can find him working
in the gym with players during school
hours helping them on their fundamentals
and it really shows his true character,”
senior student assistant coach Cole
Carlisle said.
A technical foul is not always out of
disrespect towards the officiating. It’s
about the passion that comes along with
the sport, even if you’re down forty-five
points in the second quarter.

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Author: The Hawk Eye

Hanover High School, Mechanicsville, Virginia The Hawk Eye Student Newspaper thehawkeye@hcps.us

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