HHS Presents: To Kill a Mocking-Trial

Rebekah Seay

Competitions between schools
not only occur within sports, but
academically speaking as well. While
history teacher Chris Pace is known
for his contribution to the softball
and golf teams, he is now dedicating
his time to his advanced government
classes. With the help of Pace,
both classes are teaming up to take
on the Atlee Raiders in a mock trial.
The mock trial features the case of
an injured hockey player and the
one who was responsible for his pain.
“I got an email saying this program
was available and that my
students would have the chance to
work with real life attorneys and
judges in a real court house in Hanover
County. I never knew this
existed so I was all for it,” Pace said.
While there have been meetings
outside of school, the students
have had multiple class periods
to prepare for the trial date.
Senior Jessi Mason said, “I think the
mock trial is a great way for students
to get a hands-on experience
of American government.”
Another one of Pace’s
students, senior David
Bogaev, agrees,
“I think it gives
me and
my class a
great op- p o r –
t u n i t y to look
at how the government
w o r k s . ”
Pace also believes this will benefit
his students, bringing competition
and academics together.
“What an awesome way for
them to learn about the judicial system
of the United States as opposed
to reading a textbook,” Pace said.
Through the program, an attorney
has been assigned
to each school that
chooses to participate.
Will Dickinson
from
Williams
a n d
Mullin
L a w
F i r m
in Richmond
has been
assigned to assist
Hanover High
School. Helping
these students
succeed
and to
u n –
derstand
the purpose
of their
government is a top
priority for this program.
“I think it was a great
opportunity for us to have an
attorney come to our class. He
took the time out of his schedule to
help us and he gave really good advice.
Also, the time in class has definitely
helped prepare us because it
gave everyone a chance to bounce
ideas off each other,” Mason said.
Bogaev said, “Mr. Dickinson
helped us pick out the details
that we didn’t see and he helped
is put our case together nicely.”
Even though this is an educational
project, students seem more than eager
to step into the courthouse and
participate. Many have dedicated
themselves to being an attorney or
witness for the case. Those who attend
mandatory meetings and wish
to participate verbally are assigned
a role. Those who cannot dedicate
themselves due to other
commitments will serve as
jurors or write an alternate
assignment for
an equal grade.
“I do plan
on participating
on the trial
a s either a
wit
n e s s
or a juror,”
Mason said.
The trial
will take place
on January 28th at
Hanover Court House.
While some are content not knowing
the end result, Bogaev seems
sure that the Hawks will dominate.
“I believe we have a great chance
of beating the Raiders because our
client in the trial is a professional
skater and the Raiders’ client is just
a rookie. Also, we have had plenty of
time to work on our case and we still
have time to perfect it,” Bogaev said.
Whether the Hawks leave as winners
or losers, Pace expects this experience
will tremendously benefit
everyone.

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